Procession, Bali

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections. Connor?s work often offers the viewer a parallel to contemporary life. In this photograph her subject is a woman from a traditional people in an ancient setting to contrast with our modern world. This woman represents a world where there is no rush to live life. Instead, she represents a world that is more contemplative and rich in culture.

Abandoned Classroom, Vietnam

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections. Connor?s work often offers the viewer a parallel to contemporary life. In this photograph her subject is a woman from a traditional people in an ancient setting to contrast with our modern world. This woman represents a world where there is no rush to live life. Instead, she represents a world that is more contemplative and rich in culture.

Village Woman, Nepal

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections. Connor?s work often offers the viewer a parallel to contemporary life. In this photograph her subject is a woman from a traditional people in an ancient setting to contrast with our modern world. This woman represents a world where there is no rush to live life. Instead, she represents a world that is more contemplative and rich in culture.

Ceremony, Kathmandu, Nepal

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Hennaed Hand, Nepal

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Skeleton, Shrine, Kathmandu, Nepal

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Vishnu and Consort, Kbal Spean, Cambodia

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Fountain Head, Angkor Thom, Cambodia

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Morning Ta Prohm, Angkor, Cambodia

Connor received her Bachelors of Fine Arts degree in 1967 from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1969 she acquired her Masters degree in photography from the Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology. She was a professor of photography from 1969-1999 in the Photography Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has appeared in countless exhibitions throughout the United States and the world. Prominent museums such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles include her works in their permanent collections.

Swaying Bamboo: Schoolyard Camp, Bahundanda, Nepal

Klett graduated from St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York, in 1974 with his bachelor?s degree in geology. In 1977, he received his Masters of Fine Arts degree in Photography from State University of New York in Buffalo. He also completed a program of photographic studies at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York. Klett?s solo exhibitions include the National Museum of American Art at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.; the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona; the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Illinois; and the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Japan. The Antwerp Museum of Photography in Belgium, the Art Institute of Chicago, the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York, and the Museum of Modern Art in New York are among the numerous permanent collections that include works by Klett. Klett was influenced by the late 19th century expeditionary, Timothy O?Sullivan. Famous for documenting the so-called unexplored territories of the West, O?Sullivan?s images always manage to reveal the effects man has had on the landscape. Klett?s work also focuses on the interaction between man and his environment.